A ride on the Luas Cross City with Joe & Terry

(Above: Joe Dowling who is a Community worker with HOPE in Dublin’s north inner city, pictured travelling on the new LUAS Cross City Line. Photo: Frank Mc Grath, Irish Independent, Online, Saturday 2nd December, 2017)

Last Monday, 27th November 2017, Joe Dowling & Terry Fagan were guests of the Luas and some of the first members of the public to make the journey along the forthcoming Luas Cross City. Joined by members of the press, Joe & Terry shared their thoughts on the latest addition to the city’s transport infrastructure. Their discussion was broadcast on the Sean O’Rourke show on RTÉ Radio 1, yesterday, Monday 4th December 2017.

Terry highlights the need for more public transport infrastructure and refers to other well connected European cities before we’re reminded of how well connected Dublin was in the years of Joe & Terry’s youth. Joe goes on to discuss the positivity of a well connected city and how this is an opportunity for the north inner city with prospects of shoppers, tourists, new buiness and new jobs being brought to more corners of Dublin’s north inner city.

Irish Independent, in-print, Saturday 2nd December 2017.
The Herald, in-print, Saturday 2nd December 2017.

“Joe & Terry were one of the first members of the public to take a ride on the Luas Cross City.”

From Joe & Terry take a ride on the Luas Cross City. Posted by HOPE Hands On Peer Education on 12/05/2017 (3 items)

Generated by Facebook Photo Fetcher 2

About

Hands on Peer Education, is a front-line service in Dublin’s north inner city, where those suffering with addiction and their families can get access to much needed support and treatment options. H.O.P.E. facilitates and advocates for recovery through abstinence. We also offer a wide range of advocacy services. H.O.P.E.’s free and confidential drop-in clinic is open from 10am ‘til 1pm, Monday to Friday.

Now That You’re Here

We love to get feedback, it helps us improve our service to the community. If you have a minute, we would greatly appreciate it if you write a few words about our service. Follow the link below to see our reviews on Google. Click ‘write review’ on the right hand side to add your own.

https://goo.gl/BgznUi

Many thanks from the team in H.O.P.E.

We’d like to say a huge thank you!

Spare a thought…

The winter months can be a difficult time. Especially on the run up to Christmas, the pressure to provide festive support can be excruciating. Today, we’d like to take some time to thank one who has spent the last few months preparing to help those in need this festive season!

Many thanks!

From all of us in HOPE, we’d like to say a huge thanks to Danny Cummins and his army of recruits.

Danny, for all of your gracious efforts recruiting for, organising for, and fundraising for much needed resources and festive support for the communities of Dublin’s north inner city, we cannot thank you enough. Without your hard work and dedication, this festive season drive could not be as remarkable as you have made it.

Danny has co-ordinated two fundraising events this year, the drop in the box and the sleep out. Over the last couple of months, Danny and his recruits have gone around collecting what they can from businesses and individuals for the drop in the box . As well, Danny organised a sleep-out fundraiser bucket-collection in the north inner city to help us raise much needed funds for our christmas support drive.


“Sleep-out in the north inner city to raise much needed resources for this year’s christmas drive.”

From Festive Fundraiser 2017. Posted by HOPE Hands On Peer Education on 12/01/2017 (30 items)

Generated by Facebook Photo Fetcher 2

About

Hands on Peer Education, is a front-line service in Dublin’s north inner city, where those suffering with addiction and their families can get access to much needed support and treatment options. H.O.P.E. facilitates and advocates for recovery through abstinence. We also offer a wide range of advocacy services. H.O.P.E.’s free and confidential drop-in clinic is open from 10am ‘til 1pm, Monday to Friday.

Now That You’re Here

We love to get feedback, it helps us improve our service to the community. If you have a minute, we would greatly appreciate it if you write a few words about our service. Follow the link below to see our reviews on Google. Click ‘write review’ on the right hand side to add your own.

https://goo.gl/BgznUi

Many thanks from the team in H.O.P.E.

NEC Community Garden Newsletter / FREE 8 week gardening courseposter

Want to learn the benefits of gardening and how to prepare your garden?

This course will focus on gardening tasks for early Winter. There will be another Gardening course in Spring.

  • Winter preparation for your plots and garden
  • How to prepare your garden for Spring
  • Seeding and Potting

When: Saturday 11am—1pm

Beginning 4th November

Where: NEC Community Garden (Entrance on top off Rutland Street Lower
Contact: Trevor 0858311926 & Belinda 0858030899
Email: [email protected]
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/neccom.garden
Twitter: https://twitter.com/NECCommGarden
Build your dream garden yourself. Learn about different styles of garden & how to integrate them into your own design.

NEC Community Garden Newsletter 2017

About

Hands on Peer Education, is a front-line service in Dublin’s north inner city, where those suffering with addiction and their families can get access to much needed support and treatment options. H.O.P.E. facilitates and advocates for recovery through abstinence. We also offer a wide range of advocacy services. H.O.P.E.’s free and confidential drop-in clinic is open from 10am ‘til 1pm, Monday to Friday.

Now That You’re Here

We love to get feedback, it helps us improve our service to the community. If you have a minute, we would greatly appreciate it if you write a few words about our service. Follow the link below to see our reviews on Google. Click ‘write review’ on the right hand side to add your own.
https://goo.gl/BgznUi
Many thanks from the team in H.O.P.E.

NEIC Community Event; Thursday, October 19th, 2017

What’s going on with the NEIC?

Last Thursday, October 19th, 2017, the communities of the north east inner city were invited to an open-house event in the Larkin Community College, where interested parties could find out about the North East Inner City Iniative’s Programme Implementation Board (PIB), it’s four sub groups, find out aboud what subsequent changes for the area are on the horizon, and meet the people involved.

The event was so very positive. It was a great turn-out. Micheal Stone, the PIB Chairperson, was inundated with questions for the entire event.  That is something which must be acknowledged, Micheal Stone did not sit down once. For the whole event he was up and engaging with each and every interested community representitive.

Even Joe was there for the whole event, and not his usual quick cameo. It was great to see such a good turn out and the high level of engagement on both sides. As well, Terry Fagan was out with his Folklore hat on, promoting the lauch of his new local museum. Stay tuned for more details about Terry’s museum.

“Following the publication of Kieran Mulvey’s independent report in February 2017, Michael Stone has been appointed Chairperson of the Programme Implementation Board for the North East Inner City (NEIC) Initiative. Work has commenced on the 54 actions in the Mulvey report by the new Programme Office and four dedicated sub groups.

An information day was planned for Thursday, 19th October where local residents and those who work in the area could drop in, learn more and have a say about what is happening in the community. The event took place in the Larkin Community College between 3pm and 8pm. Members of the Board were joined by others from community groups, the Gardaí, government departments and local organisations. There was a focus on four themes:

Crime and drugs;
Employment, training and education;
Family, youth and social services;
Physical landscape.

Commenting on this event, Michael Stone said: “I am determined that the NEIC Initiative will be successful and will make the North East Inner City a safe, attractive and vibrant living and working environment for all. Community involvement is key to the success of this work.”

– More information and images are available from [email protected]
– Kieran Mulvey’s report: https://merrionstreet.ie/MerrionStreet/en/ImageLibrary/20170218MulveyReport.pdf”

From NEIC Community Event October 2017. Posted by HOPE Hands On Peer Education on 10/20/2017 (8 items)

Generated by Facebook Photo Fetcher 2

About

Hands on Peer Education, is a front-line service in Dublin’s north inner city, where those suffering with addiction and their families can get access to much needed support and treatment options. H.O.P.E. facilitates and advocates for recovery through abstinence. We also offer a wide range of advocacy services. H.O.P.E.’s free and confidential drop-in clinic is open from 10am ‘til 1pm, Monday to Friday.

Now That You’re Here

We love to get feedback, it helps us improve our service to the community. If you have a minute, we would greatly appreciate it if you write a few words about our service. Follow the link below to see our reviews on Google. Click ‘write review’ on the right hand side to add your own.
https://goo.gl/BgznUi
Many thanks from the team in H.O.P.E.

‘Companies Act 2014’ Compliance

Companies Act 2014

In accordance with the Companies Act 2014, we have adopted the required changes in our constitution, incorporated status and subsequently, our company name. H.O.P.E., Hands On Peer Education is no longer ‘Limited By Guarantee’ and is now a ‘Dedicated Activity Company’.

The Companies Act 2014 was signed into law in December 2014 and was expected to commence on Monday, 1 June 2015. Until then, companies remained subject to the existing Companies Acts 1963 to 2013. The 2014 Act consolidates, with reforms, the 18 Acts and 15 statutory instruments from the past 50 years into one single piece of legislation.

With many, many thanks to A&L Goodbody, we have successfully made the transition and adopted the prescribed changes as required by the Companies Act, 2014.

With Thanks:

We would like to take this time to say thank you to A&L Goodbody for taking the time to support us with the legal requirements of complying with the Companies Act 2014.

The required changes demanded the arrangement of a massive volume of legal documentation – which is a huge workload for a small project. Thanks to the kind and gracious efforts of our neighbour, A&L Goodbody, we have successfully effected the changes required by the Companies Act 2014.

Specifically, we would like to say thank you to Sinéad Rooney & Mark Cusack of A&L Goodbody. For taking the time to arrange for, follow up on, prepare for and deliver the required legal documentation to facilitate this change in our organisation.

As such, we have been able to continue to focus on supporting the community and will continue focus on supporting the community break free from addiction.

About:

H.O.P.E.

Hands on Peer Education, is a front-line service in the north inner city, where those suffering with addiction and their families can get access to much needed support and treatment options. H.O.P.E. facilitates and advocates for recovery through abstinence. We also offer a wide range of advocacy services. H.O.P.E.’s free and confidential drop-in clinic is open from 10am ‘til 1pm, Monday to Friday.

A&L Goodbody

“A&L Goodbody has a reputation for providing legal advice of the highest quality available in Ireland, and internationally.

Our primary office is in Dublin. Together with our office in Belfast, we advise clients on an “all Ireland” basis. We advise on the most challenging and complex assignments, for national and multinational corporations, financial institutions and Government.

Our approach combines excellence of legal advice with commercial thinking. We consistently invest in and develop our business for the benefit of our clients.

We regard our people as our greatest asset and the embodiment of the Firm’s culture & values.

Founded in 1901 by Alfred and Lewis Goodbody, we are proud of our history and continue to maintain the values, principles and passion that have been the hallmarks of our Firm for more than 100 years.

Our ambition is to be consistently recognised by each of our clients as their best advisors. This is supported by the collaborative approach to our work, which we believe sets us apart.”

Now that you’re here…

We love to get feedback, it helps us improve our service to the community. If you have a minute, we would greatly appreciate it if you write a few words about our service. Follow the link below to see our reviews on Google. Click ‘write review’ on the right hand side to add your own.

https://goo.gl/BgznUi

Many thanks, from the team in H.O.P.E.

 

Under Pressure – a play about a family, the community and how they respond to a threat.

How would you respond?

Under Pressure

As part of the Five Lamps Festival there will be a special free showing for local projects & residents on the 30th August, 2017 at 1pm in Marino College, The Five Lamps.

In the mind of their creator, Gus and Molly live in Ballybough, the north-eastern edge of Dublin’s north-east inner city.

 

They are characters in Under Pressure, a play about threats and menaces in that part of Dublin, which has been developed by people who live there. It attempts to reflect one particular aspect of what has been crippling the community for decades – illegal drugs and what flows from them. – Peter Murtagh, Irish Times, Online, 24th December, 2016

The dramatic play is set in the crowded north east corner of Dublin’s inner city, where, in some situations, residents are left to fend for themselves. It deals with contemporary issues of community intimidation and how this brave family and their strong community respond.

The play, which was a part of last year’s magnificent Five Lamps festival in the Sean O’Casey Theatre, has been well received by the Irish Times, Online.

“The play is firmly rooted in the reality that many people living in the north east inner city face day in, day out”  – Peter Murtagh, The Irish Times

For some, the reality of this dramatic and contemporary play might be a little too close to home. But, it is in that reality that this community lives.  Uncut diamonds have put together a great piece of work that highlights a social issue suffered by many, all too quietly. So, be sure to save the date, spread the word and make time to see this play.

As part of the Five Lamps Festival there will be a special free showing of Under Pressure for local projects & residents on the 30th August, 2017 at 1pm in Marino College, The Five Lamps.

Thanks for coming! [#hopefest’17]

#hopefest’17

With the help of a lot of community organisations and people, we hosted a hugely successful street party – it was amazing craic! The sun was out, the food was great, and the families had a great time.  Most graciously, Peter Murtagh gave us a tremendous write-up in the Irish Times on Wednesday, 9th August, Online and in Thursday’s (10th August 2017) print edition.

“There are about 75 children, most in the toddler to young teen age bracket, shepherded by about 20 volunteers in high-vis vests.

The children spring through an elongated bouncy castle, have their faces painted, play hopscotch, generally mess about and have a good feed of chips and burgers and nuggets and curry sauce and fizzy drink.”

We were expecting around 100 guests, but as the day went on the event grew as more and more families came down and took part. Of the nearly 300 meals provided, 151 of them were kids’ meals. Circuit Catering‘s Burger Deli service was second to none. The immaculately clean food truck dished out a wide variety of chipper food – beef & chicken burgers, chicken nuggets, hot dogs, and chips with or without toppings – that the crowd thoroughly loved. Although the queue was long, the food was absolutely worth the wait.

Local youth group, Urban Soul, came down – in force – with the bouncy castle obstacle course and many, many volunteers. They manned the obstacle course, painted faces and played basketball, hopscotch, hula-hoop games, to name but a few, with the children. The children would not have had such a high level of engagement and gameplay without Urban Soul’s participation. We cannot thank them enough!

Although there was a bit of a hiccup with the venue for the magic show, Magic Martha delivered the show, al-fresco, which turned out better for the small children and added to the atmosphere of the event as it sprawled out from the Home monument. Martha puts on a great show, the children love it! Martha really knows how to hold a crowd, make them smile and laugh out loud!

The community was out, en masse, with help for the setup and running of the event. We had volunteers help us setup, with games and with music. Thanks to the community volunteers, the overall event went off without a hitch! Gerard O’Neil donated his time and DJ equipment and a number of community members took part with singing and dancing.

And in the end, the event was taken down quicker than it went up. We had the space cleared in under half an hour thanks to the army of volunteers. Now that it’s over, we’re already planning for next year 🙂

Every participant brought their best game and gave the event 110% effort, and for that we cannot thank everyone enough. That being said, none of it would have been possible without the huge support of Cluid Housing and Dublin City Council and the very gracious donation from the Croke Park Community Fund. Together however, we put on a fantastic day that will hopefully go down in memory as a great day in the summer of 2017.


“Community street party in front of the HOPE office, August 2017”

From HOPE-FEST’17. Posted by HOPE Hands On Peer Education on 8/11/2017 (206 items)

Generated by Facebook Photo Fetcher 2


Bloomsday in the Monto 2017, by Irene Crawley

A fantastic day was had by all bringing Joyce back to the North Inner City. The event was organised jointly by H.O.P.E. and the North Inner City Folklore Project with the generous help of many volunteers. We combined the traditional ‘Madame of the Monto Wedding’, with scenes from the ‘Night-Town’ chapter in James Joyce’s Ulysses. First and foremost, I would like to offer a big thank you from myself to Terry Fagan, it was a pleasure to work with you, as always.

We would like to extend our gratitude to Former Lord Mayor, Christy Burke and his beautiful “bride” and H.O.P.E. volunteer, Connie Murphy. Mick Rafferty and his troupe of actors gave a great performance of scenes leading up to the ‘Night-Town’ chapter. Dublin City Council provided great support; a stage, gazebos, tables and chairs. Anto Kelly of Kelly’s Carriages graciously donated his time to pick up the bridal party and deliver them to the wedding. The community Garda from Store Street and Fitzgibbons Street were on hand to support the event. Conor O’Mearáin was our professional photographer and did an excellent job capturing the festivities. Susan Porter spent several weeks tirelessly browsing charity shops for the great costumes. Elaine Hilliard did the hair for all the ladies who looked wonderful. Glenda Guilfoyle came along with her mobile costume unit, which was great fun. Gerard O’Neill volunteered his DJ equipment and services which added greatly to the atmosphere of the day. Delicious sandwiches were provided by George O’Brien. Carmel Cosgrove and Theresa Brady from our Management committee volunteered their services for the day. Also, serving our refreshments and helping out for the whole day in their fantastic costumes were Sandra Byrne, Shauna Byrne, Megan McEvoy, Bart Hoppenbrouwers (thank you for the photographs too), Michael Burke, Paula O’Connor, Celine Gifford, and Marilyn Molloy.

All of our staff pitched in for weeks of preparation, David Brown and Alison Grey were a huge help with everything from shopping, set up and planning – Alison also did the make-up and David is our IT Guy who organised all our promotions for the event. Finally, yet importantly, from the staff, thanks to “Father” Joe Dowling who was hilarious, as usual.

I would like to thank IMPACT for giving a grant towards the running of this event.

We would also like to thank our local representatives Maureen O’Sullivan TD (Independent), Councillor Ciarán Cuffe (Green Party) and Mary Fitzpatrick (Fianna Fáil) for coming along.

As well, we would like to thank the Irish Times for covering the event in three articles online, Live Images of Bloomsdaya video-clip of the event & a write-up on Friday 16th June 2017  and an amazing half page spread in the Saturday 17th June 2017 print edition.

Finaly, a big thanks to everyone for coming along! We hope next year to make the event bigger and better, with lots of community engagement.
-Irene Crawley, HOPE Manager


“Bloomsday in the Monto”

From Bloomsday 2017. Posted by HOPE Hands On Peer Education on 6/19/2017 (76 items)

Generated by Facebook Photo Fetcher 2

Dublin’s North East Inner City: Creating a Brighter Future

Dublin’s North East Inner City: Creating a Brighter Future

The Kieran Mulvey Report, February 2017


Last night – Thursday, 16th February, 2017 – the government task force to north east inner city launched the Kieran Mulvey report. H.O.P.E., along with many other community stakeholders, were present in anticipation of the final report. The communities of the north east inner city have suffered severe social inequalities for many years. With that in mind, this project welcomes the report and it’s suggestions.

After meeting with community groups, individuals, organisations over the last few months and taking some 50 organisational/individual submissions, Kieran Mulvey used the issues put forward to inform the report. And from these submissions, an action plan has been formulated. But what does the action plan have in store for the north east inner city?

The action plan outlines four key areas for priority action

  • Tackling crime and drugs; Better and more visible policing with an emphasis on community policing needs to be key feature in the Plan. It must be “safe” to lead; it must be “safe” to live, work, learn and play in the community.
  • Maximising educational/training opportunities/ creating local employment opportunities; There needs to be significant enhancement of the linkages between education and employment opportunity for this current generation of school goers, young adults and the unemployed in local businesses and enterprises, particularly in the business / retail area of the inner city and in the Docklands Development – both in construction and business occupation stages.
  • Creating an integrated system of social services; Social, educational and training services to address the real problems faced by families and their children need to be planned and delivered in a far more coordinated fashion. Services should be co-ordinated under a single plan which is in response to the particular needs and circumstances of different communities within the area.
  • Improving physical landscape; The area has some of the broadest streets in the City with potential for refurbishment and revitalisation. Future regeneration needs to explore the potential within the area to renovate, make it liveable and bright with improved physical landscape; to eliminate waste, derelict sites and progress the refurbishment and replacement of the existing flat complexes.

The Examiner, on Thursday, February 16, 2017 – 06:46 pm, highlights

  • Government accepts recommendations of the Mulvey Report for regeneration of the North East Inner City.
  • Ring-fenced funding of €5m will support implementation of the report.
  • Policing resources in the area to increase by 30 additional Gardaí by end 2017.
  • Rutland Street School to remain in state ownership and to be developed as a community hub.
  • Design, planning and procurement relating to the re-opening of Fitzgibbon Street Garda Station to begin.
  • Government to move quickly to put in place Implementation Structures recommended with strong Community Engagement and Government Oversight.

The full report can be read below.
 


“Kieran Mulvey’s NEIC Report Launch”

From NEIC Report Launch. Posted by HOPE Hands On Peer Education on 2/17/2017 (10 items)

Generated by Facebook Photo Fetcher 2



HRB Factsheet January 2017 – Alcohol: the Irish situation

Factsheet- Alcohol: the Irish situation

January 2017


What does alcohol do?

Alcohol is a psychoactive substance with dependence-producing properties. Consumption of alcohol and problems related to alcohol vary widely around the world, but the burden of disease and death remains significant in most countries. The harmful use of alcohol ranks among the top five risk factors for disease, disability and death throughout the world. Drinking alcohol is associated with a risk of developing such health problems as alcohol dependence, liver cirrhosis, cancers and injuries.

What is a standard drink in Ireland?

The standard drink in Ireland is 10 grams of pure alcohol.
Below are some examples of a standard drink.

  • A pub measure of spirits (35.5ml)
  • A half pint of normal beer
  • An alcopop (275ml bottle)
  • A small glass of wine (12.5% volume)

A bottle of wine at 12.5% alcohol contains about seven standard drinks.

What are the low-risk drinking guidelines in Ireland?

Low risk weekly guidelines for adults are:

  • up to 11 standard drinks in a week for women, and
  • up to 17 standard drinks in a week for men.

See more at Health Service Executive.

How dow we know how many people use alcohol in Ireland?

Every four years the National Advisory Committee on Drugs and Alcohol (NACDA) and the Northern Ireland Public Health Information and Research Branch (PHIRB) commission a survey of the general population to estimate the number of people in Ireland who use drugs and alcohol.2 Face-to-face interviews take place with respondents aged 15+a normally resident in households in Ireland and Northern Ireland. This type of survey is not designed to include people who do not normally live in private households (such as prisoners or hostel dwellers).

How much alcohol do Irish people consume?

The 2014/15 survey involved 9,505 people (7,005 in Ireland and 2,500 in Northern Ireland). The latest survey estimates show a decrease in the lifetime, last year and last month prevalence of alcohol use in the general population:

Table 1: Lifetime, last year and last month prevalence of alcohol use in the general population

The results for Ireland showed that:

  • 62.1% of Irish adults have consumed alcohol in the past month, with past year and lifetime usage at 77% and 82.8% respectively.
  • Lifetime (89.2%) and past year (83.3%) usage of alcohol is highest amongst those aged 35 to 44.
  • Last year use of alcohol is highest amongst males aged 25-34 years (86.4%) and females aged 35-44 years (81.7%).
  • Males across all age groups report higher last month usage of alcohol when compared to females within the same age range.

How much alcohol do Irish 15-16 year old students consume?

The European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs (ESPAD) has conducted surveys of school-going children every four years since 1995, using a standardised method and a common questionnaire (see www.espad.org ) including questions on alcohol, tobacco and illicit drug use. The sixth survey was conducted in 36 European countries during 2014/15.3 1,400 Irish students took part in this latest survey.
Of these

  • 74% of students have tried alcohol, with more girls (75%) than boys (72%) having done so.
  • Beer was by far the most popular drink, with 29% of students having had it in the last 30 days.
  • 28% of students had engaged in binge-drinking in the past month.
  • More girls than boys drink for mood lifting reasons, and drinking to fit in was the least popular reason reported among boys and girls.
  • Boys (7.8%, n=35) were more likely to engage in drunk driving than girls (1.1%, n=5).
  • Far more students with F grades were current drinkers (60%) than those with A grades (21%).
  • 11% of students who had no friends who used alcohol were current drinkers, compared with 69% of students who said that all their friends drink.

Table 1: Alcohol use in the last 30 days since 2003 among 15-16-year-olds in Ireland

Health-related harms

In Ireland, the Hospital In-Patient Enquiry (HIPE) scheme collects data on discharges (including deaths) from acute Irish hospitals.

All alcohol-related discharges, either wholly attributable (alcohol is a necessary cause for these conditions to manifest) or partially attributable (alcohol must be a component cause), were analysed. The number of people discharged from hospital whose condition was wholly attributable to alcohol rose by 82% between 1995 and 2013, from 9,420 to 17,120. Males accounted for 72% of these discharges and females 28%.

There has also been a steady increase in the average length of stay for hospital discharges associated with alcohol, from 6.0 days in 1995 to 10. days in 2013, which suggests that patients with alcohol-related diagnoses are becoming more complex in terms of their illness. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) was the most common chronic alcohol disease, accounting for approximately four-fifths of all alcohol-related chronic diseases in 2013. The rate of discharges with ALD increased from 28.3 per 100,000 adults aged 15 years and over in 1995 to 87.7 in 2013, an increase of 210%.

Analysis of data from the National Cancer Registry of Ireland found that between 2001 and 2010, of the 24,995 cases of breast cancer, 3,058 (12.2%) were attributable to alcohol. Of the 6,601 women who died of breast cancer, 695 (10.5%) cases were attributable to alcohol.

The National Registry of Deliberate Self-Harm is a national system of population monitoring for the occurrence of deliberate self-harm, established by the National Suicide Research Foundation. In 2015, Alcohol was involved in just over one third of all cases (31%), a slight decrease from 2014.. Alcohol was more involved in male episodes of self-harm than female episodes (34% versus 29%, respectively).

How many people receive treatment for alcohol us?

The National Drug Treatment Reporting System (NDTRS) provides data on treated drug and alcohol misuse in Ireland. The National Psychiatric Inpatient Reporting System (NPIRS) provides detailed information on all admissions and discharges to inpatient psychiatric services in Ireland.

The most recent published data from the NDTRS shows that the number of cases entering treatment who reported alcohol as their main problem drug decreased from 8,604 in 2009 to 7,541 in 2014 (-12%).
Of the 7,451 cases in 2014 who reported alcohol as their main problem drug:

  • 163 (2%) were aged under 18 years; 2,467 (33%) were aged 18–34; 2,035 (27%) were aged 35–44; and 2,542 (33%) were aged 45–64 and 237 were aged over 65 (3.2%).
  • 3,674 (48%) were new cases.
  • 1,688 (22%) lived in Dublin.
  • 4,757 (63%) were men.
  • 1,395 (18%) used alcohol with other drugs.

There has been a considerable decrease in the numbers admitted to psychiatric hospitals for alcohol treatment. The total number of people admitted to psychiatric hospitals with an alcoholic diagnosis decreased by 46.9% between 2006 and 2015, i.e. from 2,767 to 1,188.

How many people die from using alcohol?

The National Drug-Related Deaths Index (NDRDI) is a database which records cases of death by drug and alcohol poisoning, deaths among drug users and those who are alcohol dependent.
Alcohol was involved in 115 deaths (32% of all poisonings) in 2014, more than any other substance. 59% of deaths where alcohol was implicated involved other drugs (poly-drug poisonings), mainly opiates. Alcohol alone was responsible for 13% of all poisoning deaths. The number of deaths involving alcohol has decreased from 140 in 2013 to 115 in 2014.

What impact has alcohol on the Irish economy?

According to the report Overview of alcohol consumption, alcohol-related harm and alcohol policy in Ireland:

  • In 2013, alcohol-related discharges accounted for 160,211 bed days in public hospitals; that is 3.6% of all bed days that year; compared to 56,264 bed days or 1.7% of the total number of bed days in 1995.
  • €1.5 billion was the cost for alcohol-related discharges from hospital. That is equal to €1 for every €10 spent on public health in 2012. This excludes the cost of emergency cases, GP visits, psychiatric admissions and alcohol treatment services.
  • An estimated 5,315 people on the Live Register in November 2013 had lost their job due to alcohol use.
  • The estimated cost of alcohol-related absenteeism was €41,290,805 in 2013.

What does the law say about alcohol?

The Public Health (Alcohol) Bill 2015 aims to reduce alcohol consumption in Ireland to 9.1 litres per person per annum by 2020 and to reduce the harms associated with alcohol. The Bill consists of 29 sections and includes five main provisions. These are: minimum unit pricing; health labelling of alcohol products; the regulation of advertising and sponsorship of alcohol products; structural separation of alcohol products in mixed trading outlets; and the regulation of the sale and supply of alcohol in certain circumstances.

See more at Alcohol Action Ireland Public Health (Alcohol) Bill 2015: Main Measures.

Intoxicating Liquor Acts

  • It is an offence to sell alcohol to anyone under the age of 18.
  • It is an offence to buy alcohol for people under the age of 18.
  • It is also an offence to give alcohol to anyone under the age of 18 unless in a domestic home and they have parental consent.

See more at Citizens Information

For more information on alcohol please refer to the following sources:

  1. World Health Organization. (2014) Global status report on alcohol and health 2014. World Health Organization, Geneva.
  2. National Advisory Committee on Drugs & Public Health Information and Research Branch (2016) Prevalence of drug use and gambling in Ireland & drug use in Northern Ireland. Bulletin 1. Dublin: National Advisory Committee on Drugs and Alcohol.
  3. Taylor, Keishia and Babineau, Kate and Keogan, Sheila and Whelan, Ellen and Clancy, Luke (2016) ESPAD 2015: European Schools Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs in Ireland. Dublin: Department of Health.
  4. Mongan, Deirdre and Long, Jean (2016) Overview of alcohol consumption, alcohol-related harm and alcohol policy in Ireland. Dublin: Health Research Board.
  5. Griffin, Eve and Arensman, Ella and Corcoran, Paul and Dillon, Christina B and Williamson, Eileen and Perry, Ivan J (2016) National Self-Harm Registry Ireland annual report 2015. Cork: National Suicide Research Foundation.
  6. Health Research Board. (2015) Treated problem alcohol use in Ireland: figures for 2013 from the National Drug Treatment Reporting System. Health Research Board, Dublin.
  7. Treatment data HRB National Drugs Library interactive tables.
  8. Mental Health statistics HRB National Psychiatric In-patient Reporting System database.
  9. Health Research Board (2016) National Drug-Related Deaths Index 2004 to 2014 data. Health Research Board, Dublin.

Further resources:

Gavin, Aoife and Keane, Eimear and Callaghan, Mary and Molcho, Michal and Kelly, Colette and Nic Gabhainn, Saoirse (2015) The Irish Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study 2014. Department of Health and National University of Ireland, Galway, Dublin

Gell, Lucy and Ally, Abdallah and Buykx, Penny and Hope, Ann (2015) Alcohol’s harm to others. Institute of Alcohol Studies.

Hope, Ann (2015) Research evidence to prevent alcohol-related harm: what communities can do in Ireland. Galway Healthy Cities: Galway City Alcohol Strategy to Prevent and Reduce Alcohol-Related Harm (2013-2017), Galway.

Useful websites:

How to cite this factsheet:

HRB National Drugs Library (2017) Alcohol: the Irish situation. HRB National Drugs Library, Dublin www.drugsandalcohol.ie/24954

************

Other Factsheets in this series:

Cocaine: the Irish situation
Opiates: the Irish situation
Sedatives and tranquillisers: the Irish situation
Cannabis: the Irish situation

HRB National Drugs Library – Find the evidence

www.drugsandalcohol.ie

  • Quick updates – newsletter & Drugnet Ireland
  • Summaries – Factsheets & Annual national reports
  • Policy – Policy page & Dail debates
  • International research on interventions – Evidence resources
  • Publications of key organisations – HRB, NACDA & EMCDDA
  • Explanations of terms and acronyms – Glossary
  • Treatment data – Drug data link (or HRB publications)
  • Alcohol diary data
  • Search our collection – basic and advanced (you can save your results)

HRB National Drugs Library

Health Research Board
Grattan House
67-72 Lower Mount Street
Dublin 2, Ireland
t +353 1 2345 175
e [email protected]
w www.drugsandalcohol.ie