UNODC, Afghanistan partner to strengthen drug control and promote economic development in the country

Amid high illicit crop production figures in Afghanistan, UNODC has scaled up its work with partners to promote innovative strategies to integrate a development perspective into the country’s drug control efforts.

Recently, UNODC teamed up with the Ministry for Counter Narcotics of Afghanistan to host a two-day conference on “Promoting Afghanistan’s Alternative Development Initiatives among Regional and International partners” in Ashgabat, Turkmenistan.

Organized in the context of the 7th Regional Economic Cooperation Conference on Afghanistan, the event sought to increase awareness and identify opportunities for alternative development among neighboring countries. It also provided a platform to explore new partnerships between agencies working on drug control and development.

Yury Fedotov, UNODC Executive Director, delivering his remarks through a video message, said that “Alternative development can help transform communities, but they can only flourish where the rule of law and sustainable licit economies are strong.” He highlighted that the Government of Afghanistan, through its National Peace and Development Framework and National Drug Action Plan, has laid a strong foundation to build coordinated and integrated cooperation. “But these efforts require the strong support of the international community,” Mr. Fedotov added.

In his opening remarks, Jeremy Milsom, UNODC Senior Programme Coordinator of the Regional Programme said: “Security and development are indivisible, an understanding reaffirmed through the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the UN General Assembly Special Session on the world drug problem.”

UNODC’s 2017 Afghan Opium Survey shows that opium poppy cultivation and drug production chain generate huge profits, supporting criminality and insurgency, and ultimately resulting in greater insecurity. “There is no way to achieve a viable and sustainable social and economic development unless we tackle the drugs issue and insecurity,” Mr. Milsom stressed.

Also participating, Roland Kobia, Special Representative of the European Union to Afghanistan, defined alternative development as a long-term strategy that seeks a sustainable move away from illicit drug cultivation. “Access to markets is crucial to allow farmers to generate sufficient revenue to maintain a decent standard of living,” he pointed out.

Professor Salamat Azimi, Minister for Counter Narcotics of Afghanistan stressed that her country was truly committed to fighting narcotics. Citing an example, she said that the Government was developing national policies to support relevant Ministries in achieving this goal.

Over 70 senior officials and participants from Afghanistan and several senior officials from Pakistan, Iran, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Colombia and Thailand attended the event, funded by the European Union, Japan, the Russian Federation and the United States.

For over 40 years, UNODC has been working with Member States on alternative development, a principal pillar of the international drug control strategy. In Afghanistan, most illegal cultivation is driven by poverty, food insecurity, and the lack of land tenure. Alternative development seeks to reduce illicit crop cultivation and drug production by generating licit income and opportunities while providing a range of social services.

This article first appeared on the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime Website

About

Hands on Peer Education, is a front-line service in Dublin’s north inner city, where those suffering with addiction and their families can get access to much needed support and treatment options. H.O.P.E. facilitates and advocates for recovery through abstinence. We also offer a wide range of advocacy services. H.O.P.E.’s free and confidential drop-in clinic is open from 10am ‘til 1pm, Monday to Friday.

Now That You’re Here

We love to get feedback, it helps us improve our service to the community. If you have a minute, we would greatly appreciate it if you write a few words about our service. Follow the link below to see our reviews on Google. Click ‘write review’ on the right hand side to add your own.

https://goo.gl/BgznUi

Many thanks from the team in H.O.P.E.

A ride on the Luas Cross City with Joe & Terry

(Above: Joe Dowling who is a Community worker with HOPE in Dublin’s north inner city, pictured travelling on the new LUAS Cross City Line. Photo: Frank Mc Grath, Irish Independent, Online, Saturday 2nd December, 2017)

Last Monday, 27th November 2017, Joe Dowling & Terry Fagan were guests of the Luas and some of the first members of the public to make the journey along the forthcoming Luas Cross City. Joined by members of the press, Joe & Terry shared their thoughts on the latest addition to the city’s transport infrastructure. Their discussion was broadcast on the Sean O’Rourke show on RTÉ Radio 1, yesterday, Monday 4th December 2017.

Terry highlights the need for more public transport infrastructure and refers to other well connected European cities before we’re reminded of how well connected Dublin was in the years of Joe & Terry’s youth. Joe goes on to discuss the positivity of a well connected city and how this is an opportunity for the north inner city with prospects of shoppers, tourists, new buiness and new jobs being brought to more corners of Dublin’s north inner city.

Irish Independent, in-print, Saturday 2nd December 2017.
The Herald, in-print, Saturday 2nd December 2017.

“Joe & Terry were one of the first members of the public to take a ride on the Luas Cross City.”

From Joe & Terry take a ride on the Luas Cross City. Posted by HOPE Hands On Peer Education on 12/05/2017 (3 items)

Generated by Facebook Photo Fetcher 2

About

Hands on Peer Education, is a front-line service in Dublin’s north inner city, where those suffering with addiction and their families can get access to much needed support and treatment options. H.O.P.E. facilitates and advocates for recovery through abstinence. We also offer a wide range of advocacy services. H.O.P.E.’s free and confidential drop-in clinic is open from 10am ‘til 1pm, Monday to Friday.

Now That You’re Here

We love to get feedback, it helps us improve our service to the community. If you have a minute, we would greatly appreciate it if you write a few words about our service. Follow the link below to see our reviews on Google. Click ‘write review’ on the right hand side to add your own.

https://goo.gl/BgznUi

Many thanks from the team in H.O.P.E.

We’d like to say a huge thank you!

Spare a thought…

The winter months can be a difficult time. Especially on the run up to Christmas, the pressure to provide festive support can be excruciating. Today, we’d like to take some time to thank one who has spent the last few months preparing to help those in need this festive season!

Many thanks!

From all of us in HOPE, we’d like to say a huge thanks to Danny Cummins and his army of recruits.

Danny, for all of your gracious efforts recruiting for, organising for, and fundraising for much needed resources and festive support for the communities of Dublin’s north inner city, we cannot thank you enough. Without your hard work and dedication, this festive season drive could not be as remarkable as you have made it.

Danny has co-ordinated two fundraising events this year, the drop in the box and the sleep out. Over the last couple of months, Danny and his recruits have gone around collecting what they can from businesses and individuals for the drop in the box . As well, Danny organised a sleep-out fundraiser bucket-collection in the north inner city to help us raise much needed funds for our christmas support drive.


“Sleep-out in the north inner city to raise much needed resources for this year’s christmas drive.”

From Festive Fundraiser 2017. Posted by HOPE Hands On Peer Education on 12/01/2017 (30 items)

Generated by Facebook Photo Fetcher 2

About

Hands on Peer Education, is a front-line service in Dublin’s north inner city, where those suffering with addiction and their families can get access to much needed support and treatment options. H.O.P.E. facilitates and advocates for recovery through abstinence. We also offer a wide range of advocacy services. H.O.P.E.’s free and confidential drop-in clinic is open from 10am ‘til 1pm, Monday to Friday.

Now That You’re Here

We love to get feedback, it helps us improve our service to the community. If you have a minute, we would greatly appreciate it if you write a few words about our service. Follow the link below to see our reviews on Google. Click ‘write review’ on the right hand side to add your own.

https://goo.gl/BgznUi

Many thanks from the team in H.O.P.E.

NEC Community Garden Newsletter / FREE 8 week gardening courseposter

Want to learn the benefits of gardening and how to prepare your garden?

This course will focus on gardening tasks for early Winter. There will be another Gardening course in Spring.

  • Winter preparation for your plots and garden
  • How to prepare your garden for Spring
  • Seeding and Potting

When: Saturday 11am—1pm

Beginning 4th November

Where: NEC Community Garden (Entrance on top off Rutland Street Lower
Contact: Trevor 0858311926 & Belinda 0858030899
Email: [email protected]
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/neccom.garden
Twitter: https://twitter.com/NECCommGarden
Build your dream garden yourself. Learn about different styles of garden & how to integrate them into your own design.

NEC Community Garden Newsletter 2017

About

Hands on Peer Education, is a front-line service in Dublin’s north inner city, where those suffering with addiction and their families can get access to much needed support and treatment options. H.O.P.E. facilitates and advocates for recovery through abstinence. We also offer a wide range of advocacy services. H.O.P.E.’s free and confidential drop-in clinic is open from 10am ‘til 1pm, Monday to Friday.

Now That You’re Here

We love to get feedback, it helps us improve our service to the community. If you have a minute, we would greatly appreciate it if you write a few words about our service. Follow the link below to see our reviews on Google. Click ‘write review’ on the right hand side to add your own.
https://goo.gl/BgznUi
Many thanks from the team in H.O.P.E.

Ireland fourth highest in Europe for drug deaths, by Cormac O’Keefe in the Irish Examiner, 31st October 2017

This story first appeared in the Irish Examiner, Online, 31st October, 2017

Ireland has a death rate from drugs more than three times above the European average, according to an EU report.

Figures from the EU drugs agency shows the high death rate is concentrated among users under the age of 40.

Ireland’s drug-induced mortality rate is 71 per 1m people, placing us fourth out of 28 EU countries, along with Norway and Turkey. Estonia tops the table, then Sweden and Norway, with the UK in fifth place (60 per million), behind Ireland.

Ireland’s rate of drug deaths is more than four times that of the Netherlands (16.5) and 12 times that of Portugal (5.8).

“The drug-induced mortality rate among adults aged 15-64 years was 71 deaths per million in 2014, which is more than three times the most recent European average of 20.3 deaths per million,” said the report by the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction.

The Ireland Country Drug Report 2017 took data supplied by the Irish Health Research Board and compared them against 29 other European states.

This showed that Ireland has a far higher death rate among younger drug users.

It shows that 22% of people who died here were aged 35-39, compared to 16% in Europe. Some 19% of deaths in Ireland involved users aged 30-34 (15% average), 16% were aged 25-29 (11%) and 9% were aged 20-24 (8%).

It found Ireland was fifth for newly diagnosed HIV infections attributed to injecting drug use, increasing between 2014 and 2015.

The report shows that a European survey of 15- to 16-year-old students found that Ireland was below average for current use of cigarettes, alcohol, and heavy drinking. However, Irish teens scored higher than average for lifetime use of cannabis, other drugs, and inhalants

This story first appeared in the Irish Examiner, Online, 31st October, 2017

About

Hands on Peer Education, is a front-line service in Dublin’s north inner city, where those suffering with addiction and their families can get access to much needed support and treatment options. H.O.P.E. facilitates and advocates for recovery through abstinence. We also offer a wide range of advocacy services. H.O.P.E.’s free and confidential drop-in clinic is open from 10am ‘til 1pm, Monday to Friday.

Now That You’re Here

We love to get feedback, it helps us improve our service to the community. If you have a minute, we would greatly appreciate it if you write a few words about our service. Follow the link below to see our reviews on Google. Click ‘write review’ on the right hand side to add your own.
https://goo.gl/BgznUi
Many thanks from the team in H.O.P.E.

NEIC Community Event; Thursday, October 19th, 2017

What’s going on with the NEIC?

Last Thursday, October 19th, 2017, the communities of the north east inner city were invited to an open-house event in the Larkin Community College, where interested parties could find out about the North East Inner City Iniative’s Programme Implementation Board (PIB), it’s four sub groups, find out aboud what subsequent changes for the area are on the horizon, and meet the people involved.

The event was so very positive. It was a great turn-out. Micheal Stone, the PIB Chairperson, was inundated with questions for the entire event.  That is something which must be acknowledged, Micheal Stone did not sit down once. For the whole event he was up and engaging with each and every interested community representitive.

Even Joe was there for the whole event, and not his usual quick cameo. It was great to see such a good turn out and the high level of engagement on both sides. As well, Terry Fagan was out with his Folklore hat on, promoting the lauch of his new local museum. Stay tuned for more details about Terry’s museum.

“Following the publication of Kieran Mulvey’s independent report in February 2017, Michael Stone has been appointed Chairperson of the Programme Implementation Board for the North East Inner City (NEIC) Initiative. Work has commenced on the 54 actions in the Mulvey report by the new Programme Office and four dedicated sub groups.

An information day was planned for Thursday, 19th October where local residents and those who work in the area could drop in, learn more and have a say about what is happening in the community. The event took place in the Larkin Community College between 3pm and 8pm. Members of the Board were joined by others from community groups, the Gardaí, government departments and local organisations. There was a focus on four themes:

Crime and drugs;
Employment, training and education;
Family, youth and social services;
Physical landscape.

Commenting on this event, Michael Stone said: “I am determined that the NEIC Initiative will be successful and will make the North East Inner City a safe, attractive and vibrant living and working environment for all. Community involvement is key to the success of this work.”

– More information and images are available from [email protected]
– Kieran Mulvey’s report: https://merrionstreet.ie/MerrionStreet/en/ImageLibrary/20170218MulveyReport.pdf”

From NEIC Community Event October 2017. Posted by HOPE Hands On Peer Education on 10/20/2017 (8 items)

Generated by Facebook Photo Fetcher 2

About

Hands on Peer Education, is a front-line service in Dublin’s north inner city, where those suffering with addiction and their families can get access to much needed support and treatment options. H.O.P.E. facilitates and advocates for recovery through abstinence. We also offer a wide range of advocacy services. H.O.P.E.’s free and confidential drop-in clinic is open from 10am ‘til 1pm, Monday to Friday.

Now That You’re Here

We love to get feedback, it helps us improve our service to the community. If you have a minute, we would greatly appreciate it if you write a few words about our service. Follow the link below to see our reviews on Google. Click ‘write review’ on the right hand side to add your own.
https://goo.gl/BgznUi
Many thanks from the team in H.O.P.E.

What’s going on in Dublin’s north east inner city? Read the newsletter here.

Dublin North East Inner City

Creating a brighter future

Keep up-to-date with the programme implementation board delivering social and economic regeneration of Dublin’s north east inner city. You can read the newsletter below.

In July 2016, Enda Kenny’s Government launched a major initiative for  Dublin’s north east inner city to oversee the long-term social and economic regeneration of the area.

To support the work of the Ministerial Taskforce, Mr Kieran Mulvey was appointed to engage with the local community groups, representatives and other interested parties, and to report back with specific recommendations. The Mulvey Report recommended a number of new structures and appointments to lead this work.

To date, the chairperson of the group has established the Programme Implementation Board  (PIB) and four sub groups of the board are set up and meeting regularly.

The four sub groups are focussing on the following areas:

  • Crime and Drugs
  • Education and Training
  • Family, Children and Youth Services
  • Physical Infrastructure

The NEIC PIB is working collaboratively with the community, businesses and statutory agencies to create opportunity and bring about lasting change.

“I am determined that the NEIC Initiative will be successful and
make the North East Inner City a safe, attractive and vibrant
living and working environment for all.” -Micheal Stone, Chairman of the Programme Implementation Board, NEIC.

A Programme Office was established and is headed by the independent Chair of the Board. The Programme Office supports the work of the Board and is based in the Dublin City Council Central Area Headquarters at 51-53 Sean McDermott Street Lower, Dublin 1.

The NEIC programme office is working on communications and engagement, funding and administration, assisting all sub-groups, supporting the Chair of the Board Michael Stone, and regularly meeting with the community.

You can keep up to date with the implementation board and the programme office by following their newly launched website – www.neic.ie

About

Hands on Peer Education, is a front-line service in Dublin’s north inner city, where those suffering with addiction and their families can get access to much needed support and treatment options. H.O.P.E. facilitates and advocates for recovery through abstinence. We also offer a wide range of advocacy services. H.O.P.E.’s free and confidential drop-in clinic is open from 10am ‘til 1pm, Monday to Friday.

Now That You’re Here

We love to get feedback, it helps us improve our service to the community. If you have a minute, we would greatly appreciate it if you write a few words about our service. Follow the link below to see our reviews on Google. Click ‘write review’ on the right hand side to add your own.
https://goo.gl/BgznUi
Many thanks from the team in H.O.P.E.

What’s going on in Dublin’s North East Inner City? – Event Notice

When : Thursday, 19th October 2017
Where : Larkin Community College, Dublin 1.
Time : from 3pm to 8pm

Following the publication of Kieran Mulvey’s independent report in February 2017, Michael Stone has been appointed Chairperson of the Programme Implementation Board for the North East Inner City (NEIC) Initiative. Work has commenced on the 54 actions in the Mulvey report by the new Programme Office and four dedicated sub groups.

An information day is planned for Thursday, 19th October where local residents and those who work in the area can drop in, learn more and have a say about what is happening in the community. The event will take place in Larkin Community College from 3pm to 8pm and people are encouraged to come along at any stage. Members of the Board will be joined by others from community groups, the Gardaí, government departments and local organisations. There will be a focus on four themes:

  • Crime and drugs
  • Employment, training and education
  • Family, youth and social services
  • Physical landscape

Commenting on this open invitation, Michael Stone said: “I am determined that the NEIC Initiative will be successful and will make the North East Inner City a safe, attractive and vibrant living and working environment for all. Community involvement is key to the success of this work.”

The venue is fully accessible and tea and coffee will be available. Everyone is welcome.
– More information and images are available from [email protected]
– Kieran Mulvey’s report: https://merrionstreet.ie/MerrionStreet/en/ImageLibrary/20170218MulveyReport.pdf

Unlocking the Past is Fundamental to Recovery, by Thomas Beck on Sober Nation

This story first appeared on Sober Nation, Online, August 23rd 2017

Life experience and addiction are intrinsically linked. It’s an unquestionable fact, yet many substance users fail to make the connection before a condition spirals out of control.

The reality is that we learn cycles of behavior and thought early in life through our interactions with people and the environment around us. As these factors continue to influence the way we think and act, it becomes increasingly difficult to see past learned behaviors. And sometimes, life events and experiences can lead to the development of unrealistic and harmful thought patterns of self and society.

For instance, children who witness or experience physical abuse while growing up often develop their own ideas for why it happens. They may feel responsibility or blame themselves for the inappropriate actions of others. While these beliefs are not grounded in reality, they can have a dramatic impact on how children view the world.

Or, consider how some children learn behavior from their parents. If a child watches a parent drink alcohol to manage anger or stress, this behavior may appear as an acceptable coping skill. As such, a child who learns this behavior may repeat it as an adult.

Negative life events, a skewed sense of reality or learned behavior can play a significant role in the development of a substance use disorder. If not identified early or treated properly, a person’s past may continue to haunt them, leading to a desire to escape painful feelings through misuse of drugs or alcohol. Consequently, making the connection between life events and addition is critical to successful recovery.

Life Events and Addiction: The Connection

Suppression, the conscious act of eliminating a thought pattern, is a fundamental contributor to behavior that leads to substance abuse. People who suffer from addiction commonly use drugs or alcohol to aid in suppressing painful memories, traumatic events or feelings of guilt and shame.

Often, suppression becomes a roadblock to addiction recovery. The more we ignore our past, the further we move from reality. Addiction then becomes a disconnect from rational thought processes, which hinder our ability to remember and address life events in a healthy way. Substance users may become increasingly confused, contributing to feelings of anger, shame and guilt, and ultimately creating a vicious addiction cycle.

Effective recovery from addiction requires a baseline understanding of life experience to keep this cycle from exacerbating. For this reason, we ask patients to write out their life story as a first step to recovery. Once a patient understands his or her past, he or she can break down life experiences, compartmentalize them and begin processing events that have influenced thought patterns.

Every life story is different, and triggers of substance abuse come in many forms. Without this baseline understanding, treatment is less effective in holistically treating the individual and helping them develop healthier thought patterns and behaviors.

Identifying, Letting Go and Creating New Patterns

Many substance users who have suppressed thoughts over time find it difficult to remember the past. In these cases, it helps to write a timeline of 10 to 15 events that led them to where they are today. Often, this exercise brings more memories to the surface and allows you to fill in the gaps of your life story. Then, you can better break down and simplify overwhelming amounts of past knowledge.

For instance, grief and loss is often a trigger of substance use, yet many people fail to make the connection. If you write out a timeline of events, you can see where an addiction formed or got out of control, and subsequently identify its association to a grief and loss event. Once identified, you can work with a counselor to better address the underlying trigger of addiction, process the painful event and establish a way forward.

The best setting for writing out a life story varies. Some patients feel overwhelmed by a group setting at first and are best suited to start the process of identifying the past through individual counseling. Others may be more apt to progress quickly in a group setting. Ultimately, all patients can benefit from life story groups, as this framework helps substance users learn from each other, gain confidence and grasp that they are not alone in their struggles.

The process of identifying life events and letting go of destructive thought patterns takes time, but it is the first step to healing. Once we begin verbalizing our pain and learning from past experiences, we can then begin letting go of painful memories and thoughts we want to suppress. It is at this stage that new patterns of behavior are possible.

Every life story is categorically unique; our individual experiences shape our existence and are incomparable to others. The journey to recovery begins with our life story. By looking back, we can understand the triggers of addiction, address guilt and shame and ultimately, create a new way of thinking.

This story first appeared on Sober Nation, Online, August 23rd 2017

About

Hands on Peer Education, a.k.a. H.O.P.E., is a front-line service in Dublin’s north inner city, where those suffering with addiction and their families can get access to much needed support and treatment options. H.O.P.E. facilitates and advocates for recovery through abstinence. We also offer a wide range of advocacy services. H.O.P.E.’s free and confidential drop-in clinic is open from 10am ‘til 1pm, Monday to Friday.

Now That You’re Here

We love to get feedback, it helps us improve our service to the community. If you have a minute, we would greatly appreciate it if you write a few words about our service. Follow the link below to see our reviews on Google. Click ‘write review’ on the right hand side to add your own.

https://goo.gl/BgznUi

Many thanks from the team in H.O.P.E.

Institutionalised Lives in Ireland

 Forced Labour

During the Irish State’s infancy and right up to modern times, a variety forced labour institutions under the control of the Church and sanctioned by the State, robbed men, women and children of the basic human rights we hold dear today as Irish and European citizens. The institutions took three forms, Mother & Baby homes, Industrial Schools and the Magdalen Asylum for Penitent Females a.k.a. Magdalen Laundries. The idea behind these institutions was to provide for the vulnerable, people of all ages, on the island of Ireland. Although, they were regarded as religious penitentiaries where, in actuality, many of the inmates were subjected to horrific atrocities that can only be described as criminal.

Many were sent for the “crime” of being unmarried and pregnant, and they worked without pay in the laundries which supplied services to State-run bodies, hospitals and hotels. Kitty Holland, Irish Times, Online, 25th August, 2017

On Friday, August 25th, 2017, at the site of one of the last Magdalene Laundry (closed in 1996, on Sean McDermott Street, Dublin) the community came together to seek justice for the many victims of the Magdalene Laundry’s.  In attendance were a number of surviving victims  who bravely stood up and shared their experiences. The stories are heart breaking. Please take some time to see our videos of their moving stories.

Today, the Irish Government has recognised the need for reparations and recognition of the atrocities suffered by men, women and children across Ireland at the hands of the Church under the authority of the State.   But, it is not enough. At a bare minimum we are seeking that this Magdalene Laundry site host a decent memorial, so that this is not another atrocity minimized or wiped from our memories. We in HOPE support public consultation on the use of the site to be sold by Dublin City Council and in particular, we support a suitable memorial to the woman and children who suffered behind those walls.

Institutional Syndrome

Also known as ‘institutionalisation‘, refers to deficits or disabilities in social and life skills, which develop after a person has spent a long period living in residential institutions. In other words, individuals in institutions may be deprived (whether unintentionally or not) of independence and of responsibility, to the point that once they return to “outside life” they are often unable to manage many of its demands; it has also been argued that institutionalised individuals become psychologically more prone to mental health problems.

Direct Provision

With the closure of the industrial schools, magdalene asylums, and the mother & baby homes, it was thought that institutionalistion was to become a thing of the past. Instead, the institutional syndrome has shifted from one vulnrable group to another. Direct provision is the system for dealing with migrants seeking asylum in the Republic of Ireland.

Today, many asylum seekers in the State’s direct provision system spend years in conditions which most agree are damaging to the health, welfare and life-chances of those forced to endure them. Asylum seekers are not allowed to work. They are not entitled to social welfare. And they are excluded from social housing and free third-level education. In all, more than 4,300 people, including 1,600 children, live in 34 accommodation centres spread across the State. Carl O’Brien & Sinead O’Shea, The Irish Times Online, 8th August 2017

 

Irish institution survivors share their experiences. A compilation of video clips recorded at the rally for an Honourable Magdalene Memorial, Sean McDermott Street Magdalene Asylum (closed in 1996), Friday 25th August, 2017.

Support

If you have been affected by the contents of this article in anyway, please do feel free to reach out. H.O.P.E. is here to support the community in anyway we can. As well, for further support, please find some external links below:

Dublin Honours Magdalenshttps://www.facebook.com/dublinhonoursmagdalenes/

The Alliance Victim Support Grouphttp://www.alliancesupport.org/

Residential Institutions Redress Boardhttp://www.rirb.ie/

Towards Healinghttp://www.towardshealing.ie/index.html

Coalition of Mother & Baby Home Survivorshttps://www.facebook.com/Coalition-of-Mother-And-Baby-home-Survivors-CMABS-526069800892810/

Justice for Magdalene Laundrieshttp://www.magdalenelaundries.com/

Oasis Counsellinghttp://oasiscentre.ie/

The Irish Immigrant Support Centre – http://www.nascireland.org/campaigns-for-change/direct-provision/

Irish Refugee Council http://www.irishrefugeecouncil.ie/

About

Hands on Peer Education, is a front-line service in the north inner city, where those suffering with addiction and their families can get access to much needed support and treatment options. H.O.P.E. facilitates and advocates for recovery through abstinence. We also offer a wide range of advocacy services. H.O.P.E.’s free and confidential drop-in clinic is open from 10am ‘til 1pm, Monday to Friday.

Now that you’re here

We love to get feedback, it helps us improve our service to the community. If you have a minute, we would greatly appreciate it if you write a few words about our service. Follow the link below to see our reviews on Google. Click ‘write review’ on the right hand side to add your own.

https://goo.gl/BgznUi

Many thanks from the team in H.O.P.E.